Features

Expulsion of students as a tool of control

In order to silence dissident voices within Belarusian higher education, students with uncomfortable political views are often expelled. International critique has resulted in a decrease in the number of expulsions, but the repression continues. The university administration merely has changed methods and nowadays focuses on the students with a capacity to lead others.

By Marina Henrikson Inga kommentarer till Expulsion of students as a tool of control

Criminalization of women’s mobilization & the punishing of gender studies

The emergency rule of the last two years has created useful cases to understand what the authoritarian government in Turkey are trying to do in terms of women’s mobilization and gender studies at the universities. Celebrations of March 8 have been turned into a battleground to intimidate women’s mobilization through violent police interventions. In addition, it has become increasingly difficult to engage in women’s, gender, and LGBTI studies due to the changing nature of universities and related departments. However, these attempts have not been without resistance.

By Derya Keskin Inga kommentarer till Criminalization of women’s mobilization & the punishing of gender studies

“Academics are fired, jailed, and blacklisted”

Academic independence and freedom in Turkey have long been influenced by the neoliberalization of universities and state control of the agenda in science and education. However, since the “We will be not be a party to this crime” petition released on January 11, 2016, calling for an end to curfews in Kurdish towns and a renewed commitment to the reconciliation process with Kurdish parties, the current Justice and Development Party (Adalet ve Kalkınma Partisi, AKP) government has increased its reaction to academics and academia in general by firing, jailing, and starting legal proceedings against academics.

By Yasemin Gülsüm Acar Inga kommentarer till “Academics are fired, jailed, and blacklisted”

Lithuania – a century of remembering & forgetting

During 1918 all three Baltic countries managed to escape the Russian grip and enjoyed some two decades of independence before they came under Russian/Soviet rule again. Despite the fact that the loss of their independence lasted for the following 50 years, all three countries celebrate their centenary this year. So how are the past 100 years described? During my years as a journalist in Vilnius, one of my major interests was precisely the way in which the country portrayed its own history. Over the years I pinpointed facts and covered aspects of this history that were not often highlighted in official speeches or by mainstream media. In the following I will focus on two topics in the case of Lithuania — the Soviet period and the Jews.

By Påhl Ruin Inga kommentarer till Lithuania – a century of remembering & forgetting

Charter 97 and the shrinking space for free media in Belarus

Independent media in Belarus is experiencing continued difficulties due to President Alexandr Lukashenko’s repressive policies. To avoid censorship, a number of independent media outlets, such as the most popular news site Charter 97, have chosen to work from abroad. Although this might give them maneuvering space to go on reporting, it also means that many Belarusian citizens do not have access to a sufficient amount of opposition news.

By Marina Henrikson Inga kommentarer till Charter 97 and the shrinking space for free media in Belarus

the years of fear the kgb building in riga

The purpose of this paper is to focus attention on the Stūra Māja [Corner House] of Riga and how the building was used. I have also conducted interviews, with both the former Latvian KGB Chief Edmunds Johanson, as well as the former Latvian dissident Leo Hiršsons.

By Rosario Napolitano Inga kommentarer till the years of fear

Archiving the past, defining the present open society archives, Budapest

Although the primary interest of the OSA was the heritage of the Cold War and communism, it soon extended its interests to include human rights archives. The first was an archive on the Yugoslav wars, including documents of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Initially, interest in this archive was based on its relation to the aftermath of communism, but later it was realized that “it was a document of human rights”, and this subject was accepted as a part of the OSA’s key activity.

By Anna Kharkina Inga kommentarer till Archiving the past, defining the present

CEU’s fate a symbol of what went wrong

In Hungary, the amount of protest to follow the announcement of Lex CEU was probably underestimated by the government, yet one relatively unexpected feature was that even a number of influential conservative public figures went against the prime minister and showed their support for CEU.

By Péter Balogh Inga kommentarer till CEU’s fate a symbol of what went wrong

The Blue and White pin that matters

The founders of CEU, politicians, including PM Orban, had a common dream back then. That dream was that we would build a free and successful country where not party apparatchiks, but academics decide who can study at a university, and what institution can call itself a university.

By Andrea Petö Inga kommentarer till The Blue and White pin that matters

”Sweden is stepping out of the colonial closet”

Sweden’s indigenous people, the Sami, have struggled for years to get more attention. With little result. But now something is happening.

By Påhl Ruin Inga kommentarer till ”Sweden is stepping out of the colonial closet”