Features

spomeniks symbolism gone for good?

Spomeniks are monuments commemorating the World War  II dot the landscape: gigantic futuristic creations that in some cases have been spared destruction.

By Sara Bergfors 1 kommentar till symbolism gone for good?

Survival Kit festival in Riga art against crisis

When the shops in the center of Riga emptied out in the wake of the economic crisis, the artists were given free reign over the spaces – the result was an art festival.

By Kathrin Bernard Inga kommentarer till art against crisis

Report from Aurora Fashion Week Russia russian glamour in competition

The fact that Moscow and St. Petersburg house in total five fashion events every season makes one think that the fashion business is considered attractive and economically sound in Russia. However, despite the growth of the Russian fashion market since the 1990s, the fashion industry is losing ground to other promising fashion hubs.

By Ekaterina Kalinina 1 kommentar till russian glamour

Revisiting Kaliningrad and Its Region

The city of Kaliningrad itself with its 450,000 inhabitants has acquired a European face. New buildings and shops have appeared all over the center, and the modern shopping malls are packed with both imported and Russian products, marked and sold with electronic bar codes.

By Ingmar Oldberg Inga kommentarer till and Its Region

TOO MUCH NITROGEN OR TOO MUCH PHOSPHORUS? CONTROVERSY IN BALTIC waters

Scientists have not always agreed on either the causes or the possibility of restoring the cloudy, fish-poor, partially oxygen-deficient, algae-blooming, oil-slicked Baltic Sea. Wherein lies the disagreement? There seem to be two main controversies: 1. The Baltic Sea is eutrophic. Or is the Baltic Sea not eutrophic? 2. Algae blooms are controlled by the nutrient phosphorus. Or is the bloom controlled by both phosphorus and nitrogen?

By Ann-Louise Martin Inga kommentarer till OR TOO MUCH PHOSPHORUS?

Inventing Galicia The province that became a project

Even though, with the dissolution of Austria-Hungary, Galicia ceased to exist, the idea of Galicia has a kind of ghostly presence in contemporary politics. The area was incorporated in 1919—1923 in the resurrected Polish state, only to be divided twenty years later between Germany and the Soviet Union as a result of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact. This cleaving in two endured through the “shift” of Poland westwards after the Second World War. East Galicia became part of Soviet Ukraine and thereafter of independent Ukraine.

By Anders Hammarlund Inga kommentarer till The province that became a project

BOTH VICTIM AND PERPETRATOR Ukraine’s problematic relationship to the Holocaust

For various reasons, Ukraine’s relationship to the Holocaust and the Jews has been overshadowed by the similar, but more striking […]

By Ingmar Oldberg Inga kommentarer till Ukraine’s problematic relationship to the Holocaust

Gulag part of Europe’s history

The new virtual Gulag museum in Paris appears in many languages and transcends national boundaries.

By Florence Fröhlig Inga kommentarer till of Europe’s history

the holocaust and poland From Repressed memories and Fear to an Open Society

What began in Poland, with the publication of Jan Tomasz Gross’s provocative essays, the most recent historical studies, and the research project initiated by the Polish Center for Holocaust Research, is a new phase in the public debate about the Polish nation’s relationship to the Holocaust. What is totally new is that historians and researchers in Poland are now leading the way and providing the most difficult answers to the most difficult questions.

By Peter Johnsson Inga kommentarer till From Repressed memories and Fear to an Open Society

To shed light on the cod A Baltic journey with a camera and a desire for Knowledge

The film "For Cod’s Sake" shows the bizarre EU management of this now rare gold in an impressive way. While the Polish fisherman on his rickety cutter takes a few hundred kilograms of cod out of the sea illegally, Rickard Sollander, a Swede, is allowed to take 1.5 tons from the water each week with his extremely modern trawler. His huge net invariably catches eight tons. According to EU rules, he must throw nearly seven tons back into the sea, all dead. “You turn your back and try to think about something else”, he says sadly.

By Thomas Borchert 1 kommentar till A Baltic journey with a camera and a desire for Knowledge