Interviews

”Is it the swan song of patriarchy, or the beginning of a new ice age?” Interview with Agnieszka Graff and Elżbieta Korolczuk

Agnieszka Graff and Elżbieta Korolczuk in an interview about the phenomenon of anti-genderism: a topic they written together on and both try to understand as it is spreading in Poland but also widely elsewhere

By Eva Karlberg No Comments on ”Is it the swan song of patriarchy, or the beginning of a new ice age?”

Muted histories and reunited memories a story of a Swedish family during the times of the Russian Revolution

Early this fall Irina Seits, Russian PhD candidate at CBEES, Södertörn University met with Gustaf Nobel, Ludvig’s great-grandson, in order to talk about the Russian period in the life of his prominent family.

By Irina Seits No Comments on Muted histories and reunited memories

A discussion on the Bakhtin Circle

Paromita Chakrabarti and Yulia Gradskova discuss the Bakhtin Circle with five experts in the field: Caryl Emerson, university professor emeritus of Slavic languages and literatures, Princeton University; Lakshmi Bandlamudi, professor of psychology at LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York; Ken Hirschkop, professor of English at the University of Waterloo, Ontario; Craig Brandist, professor of cultural theory and intellectual history and director of the Bakhtin Centre, at the University of Sheffield; and Galin Tihanov, the George Steiner professor of comparative literature at Queen Mary University of London.

By Paromita Chakrabarti No Comments on A discussion on the Bakhtin Circle

“Good literature is like lightning: it has to shock, to pierce the heart”

In this interview, Laura Sintija Černiauskaitė shares her experience of becoming a writer in the post-Soviet conditions of 1990s Lithuania. Her development as a writer coincided with a drastic change in what it meant to be a writer: from being a political spokesperson to being an economic entity.

By Stephan Collishaw No Comments on “Good literature is like lightning: it has to shock, to pierce the heart”

The Russian economy at the crossroads Before and beyond the Ukrainian crisis

"Business is not particulary concerned with democratic values, but rather with the existence of stable rules of the game and secured property rights for investors, says professor Andrei Yakovlev, head of the Institute for Industrial and Market Studies at the higher School of Economics in Moscow.

By Ilja Viktorov No Comments on The Russian economy at the crossroads

The voice of the excluded

Poet, essayist, film critic, journalist, feminist activist, researcher at Polish Academy of Science, literary researcher at Jewish Historical Institute and lecturer in gender studies at Warsaw University — Bożena Keff’s professional career is as multifaceted as it is interdisciplinary, and her interests impressively manifold.

By Renata Ingbrant No Comments on The voice of the excluded

The Crimean Tatar leader Mustafa Jemiloglu: “I myself is an optimist.”

Today there is a new reign of terror against the Crimean Tatars, as well as against the Ukrainian population in Crimea. Mustafa Jemiloglu has once again been forced out from Crimea. He was after a meeting in Ankara in March refused to enter Crimea and come back to his home in Bakhchisaray.

By Peter Johnsson No Comments on The Crimean Tatar leader Mustafa Jemiloglu: “I myself is an optimist.”

Interview with Iryna Dovgana. The Dignity of Donbas

Iryna Dovgan is one of several women that helped Ukrainian soldiers. But she was caught and imprisoned for several days. She was beaten, injured and humiliated. Today she stands up for her rights and is running in the election campaign.

By Peter Johnsson No Comments on The Dignity of Donbas

The Legacy of Tandemocracy Russia’s political elite during Putin’s third presidency:

The Russian researcher Olga Kryshtanovskaya discusses Russian political elites and their role in the political process in Russia. According to Kryshtanovskaya, a new class of rich people is emerging, a hereditary aristocracy which has yet to be legitimized in the Russian collective consciousness.

By Ilja Viktorov No Comments on Russia’s political elite during Putin’s third presidency:

Traveling through the German historical landscape A talk with Mary Fulbrook

In her book on the East German experiment, The People’s State, Fulbrook launched a concept that owes a lot to her life-long preoccupation with Max Weber’s theories of Herrschaft. She calls it “participatory dictatorship”. An unbelievably large proportion of the population — roughly one in six, she calculated — took an active part in activities that had to be carried out to uphold the political system as such.

By Anders Björnsson No Comments on A talk with Mary Fulbrook