contributors

Alexandra Dmitrieva and Zhanna Kravchenko

Alexandra Dmitrieva, PhD in sociology, currently working as an expert for several grassroots NGOs specializing in groundwork with drug. Previously a researcher at the Department of Sociology, St. Petersburg State University.
Zhanna Kravchenko, Associate professor in sociology and senior lecturer in social work at the School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University. Research focus: public policies in Russia and Sweden.

view all contributors

Articles by Alexandra Dmitrieva and Zhanna Kravchenko

  1. Azerbaijan’s Snap Parliamentary Election: One Step Forward Two Steps Back

    On the one hand the fact that, yet again, there was no real election is of course disheartening. On the other the increased activity and participation provides a silver lining as it revealed politics are not ‘dead’ in Azerbaijan. In fact the campaign highlighted not only the existence of a range of political ideas, but the presence of a large body of volunteers showing interest in commitment to the political process as they supported their candidates.

  2. Become a contributor

    Baltic Worlds appears four times a year. The journal publishes scholarly articles but also reviews, essays and commentaries. All content is […]

  3. The revision of Herstory. Global state socialist women’s activism from a new perspective

    Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War. Kristen Ghodsee. Duke University Press, 2019, 328 pages.

  4. Linking gender and food in the late Soviet context Narratives, discourses, representations

    Seasoned Socialism: Gender and Food in Late Soviet Everyday Life , Ed. by Anastasia Lakhtikova, Angela Brintlinger, and Irina Glushchenko. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2019, 396 pages

  5. The Chernobyl disaster. From the explosion to the closing of the plant

    Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy, Serhii Plokhy, Penguin (2019), 432 pages, Winner of the Baillie Gifford Prize 2018

  6. Missing people, missing times: The Internet, archaeology, and the spectacular

    We are, as my examples show, tricked into believing that archaeological research, museum practices, and the digitalization of museum objects, archived material, and so on will make a secret world more open and transparent and that this will be positive for the public, democracy, and for the scientific community. The real world is, however, much more dynamic and diverse but always out of reach for the public because of our naïve desire for the Internet. Archive and museum activities are a practice done in reality, not on the Internet, and so is research.

  7. On the production and suspension of time

    More than anything else, the avant-garde is the area of the production of the past: the colossal amounts of memoirs, artefacts, and photographs that are accumulated in archives — in different kinds of archives, including personal ones, but also state archives, and many others of different kinds.

  8. “There is no heritage”

    Irina Sandomirskaja in a conversation with philosophers Jean-Luc Nancy and Peter Trawny on the subject of nationalism and cultural heritage.

  9. The Heritage of the Missing Some remarks from an international law perspective

    There is an emerging regime of international law for protecting cultural heritage that focuses on three things: (1) conflict resolution between disputing parties, (2) safe return of cultural objects to legitimate claimants, and (3) criminal justice meted out to individuals who have acted in bad faith, mala fide.

  10. The missing of history in heritage H.G. Adler's novel The Wall

    The property of the disappeared first becomes mere “things” without name, use, or status. Then they turn into museum artifacts of ethnographic, aesthetic, or historical value (at least those of them that are not stolen by the “conquerors” nor rejected by the experts). Then, again, with the collapse of the museum project, what used to be displayed as cultural heritage turns again into “just things”. They burden their custodians who only wish to get rid of them.

Looking for someone? Enter a contributor's name and we will have a look!

Here you can read about the people who have been involved in Baltic Worlds. The texts and images have been provided by the individuals themselves.

If you have contributed to Baltic Worlds and would like to update your presentation, or if you want to send a message to one of our collaborators, send an email to bw.editor@sh.se.