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Ann-Cathrine Jungar is associate professor at Södertörn university and Director of Studies of BEEGS (Baltic and East European Graduate School).

Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Ann-Cathrine Jungar is associate professor at Södertörn university and Director of Studies of BEEGS (Baltic and East European Graduate School).

She has been writing on governmental behaviour, europeanisation, national parliaments, gender equaltiy and referenda. She is currently leading a multidisciplinary research project ”New Voices, Old Roots, Populism in Enlarged Europe”.

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Articles by Ann-Cathrine Jungar

  1. Challenges await the True Finns

    The Finnish voters were called to the ballot boxes for the third time in little more than a year on Sunday, October 28th. It was the local elections’ turn. The question on everybody’s minds was whether the True Finns would reprise their success in the parliamentary election.

  2. Right wing extremism. Conceived football hooliganism

    Nationalist and anti-Semitic symbols, racist statements and the making of monkey sounds when black players enter the plan are a few examples of what goes on the football fields in Ukraine and Poland. Racism and intolerance are not exclusive problems for the two countries hosting the football championships, but a shared concern for Europe.

  3. A clear victory for Niinistö in the Finnish presidential elections

    Sauli Niinistö, a former finance minister and speaker of the parliament from the conservative National Coalition party received 62,7 per cent of the votes, a result which came as no surprise. Sauli Niinistö has throughout the entire presidential campaign been clear on how the role of the new president is to be played. Since the president has a direct mandate from the people he is entitled to engage also in other policy domains than those prescribed in the Finnish constitution.

  4. The Finnish Presidential Election: An office in transition

    When the voters go to the polls for the second round of the Finnish presidential election on Sunday February 5, the ultimate winner will be destined for a significantly weakened presidential office. The role of the future president was of the main issues during the first round of electoral campaign and will be further debated during the upcoming week between the two finalists.

  5. First round. The Finnish Presidential Elections

    The first round of the Finnish presidential elections last Sunday both fulfilled expectations and offered surprising results. Sauli Niinistö, the candidate of the National Coalition party, was as expected given the greatest number of votes. The competition about the second ticket to the presidential final turned out to be a much more exciting and a close race than expected.

  6. Finnish version of populism

    The Finnish version of populism is known in the vernacular as “Vennamoism,” after the colorful founder and long-time leader of the Finnish Rural Party, Veikko Vennamo. Although Finnish populism has been pronounced dead over and over again, it has always managed to rise again and reinvent itself. The high polling numbers of the True Finns in the lead-up to the forthcoming Finnish general election in April indicate that populism in Finland is once again making a comeback as a political force to reckon with.

  7. Election coverage

    Ann-Cathrine Jungar co-ordinate Baltic Worlds’ election coverage, on elections taking place in countries around the Baltic Sea region and in [...]

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