contributors

Anna Hedén and Thomas Lundén

Anne Hedén is historian and journalist, focusing on political and social movements and currently affiliated to Arbetarrörelsens arkiv [Swedish Labour Movement’s Archive and Library] and Stockholm University.
Thomas Lundén is Professor emeritus of human geography, CBEES, Södertörn University, with a focus on border studies and minorities.

view all contributors

Articles by Anna Hedén and Thomas Lundén

  1. Tajikistan’s Fake Election

    Unsurprisingly, the ruling People’s Democratic Party, won Tajikistan’s parliamentary elections on March 1, 2020. The election campaign was a muted affair. No previous Tajik election has been judged free and fair by legitimate international observers. The Central Election Commission stated that the elections were open and transparent, and reported that it received no reports of violations. But independent observers reported a slew of violations, including ballot stuffing and proxy voting.

  2. Slovak Parliamentary Elections 2020:  Drugs, Computer Games and Islamophobia

    On Sunday March 1, Slovakia woke up to a new political era. Slovaks showed to former ruling parties (SMER – SD, Slovak National Party and the Bridge) that there were fed up with their empty promises and all the corruption, scandals and nepotism. They decided to give a chance to Matovič and some of the other opposition parties.

  3. Feminists revisit the breakups and breakthrough of 1989

    Conversation with Slavenka Drakulić, Croatia; Samirah Kenawi, Germany; Tamara Hundorova, Ukraine; Ewa Kulik-Bielińska, Poland; and Olga Lipovskaia, Russia.

  4. “Almost every nationally-defined state turned autocratic and anti-pluralistic”

    Kristina Jõekalda and Linda Kaljundi in a conversation with Joep Leerssen on past and present nationalism in Europe and beyond. Joep Leerssen, Professor of European Studies at the University of Amsterdam, is one of the leading scholars of nationalism, having initiated several innovative projects and produced influential texts in the field.

  5. Talking about the past and future of the Baltic states

    The theme of this year’s conference, the 13th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe (CBSE) was “Baltic Solidarity” — and most appropriate, no one less than Lech Wałęsa was there to open the event.

  6. The case of Tadeusz Kulisiewicz Exploring the role and life of artists during Cold War

    Around 20 researchers met in the Polish city of Kalisz for two days in mid-October, to present their on-going projects exploring issues related to artists in the political systems of the countries of Central Europe after 1945.

  7. Rethinking Colonialism(s) in Eastern Europe

    The WeberWorldCafé-event “Legacies of Colonialism in East Central Europe”, took place in October 15, 2019 in the Museum am Rothenbaum – Kulturen und Künste der Welt, Hamburg.

  8. Social and political memories colliding in public space The case of post-Euromaidan Shyshaky

    This paper examines the politics of monument building and the “de-communization” of public space in Ukraine. It first introduces the conceptual categorization of societal-political interaction over memory in order to showcase permutations between between the two types of memory. It then proceeds to evaluate recent memory developments in the case study of the provincial town of Shyshaky in central Ukraine. I argue that official governmental memory politics is secondary to a broader social memory dynamics in re-structuring the local memory landscape in how it represents Ukraine’s WWII experience and its Soviet past. Approaching the local memory developments as a case of permutations between social and political memories yields greater and more accurate insight.

  9. Hungarian vineyard landscapes in transition A case study from Lake Balaton

    The author traces the transformation of vineyard hills and their change of function through the example of a small village close to Lake Balaton. Under the impact of tourism these areas are gaining a new function: besides agricultural production they are now acquiring a recreational role. As part of this process there have also been substantial changes in the use of the buildings used to process grapes and store wines as the new owners have converted them into second homes or holiday homes. In certain respects the buildings on the vineyard hill also reflect this transformation in the relationship between the landscape and man. The newcomers no longer look on the landscape as a source of livelihood but as a kind of refuge where they can escape urban life from now and then.

  10. “It is essential that heritage is safeguarded as well as being kept alive”

    A conversation with geographer Mark McCarthy and anthropologist and human rights lawyer Adriana Arista-Zerga on the clashes, conflicts, but also cooperation, when rural areas and historical narratives become cultural heritage and tourism attractions.

Looking for someone? Enter a contributor's name and we will have a look!

Here you can read about the people who have been involved in Baltic Worlds. The texts and images have been provided by the individuals themselves.

If you have contributed to Baltic Worlds and would like to update your presentation, or if you want to send a message to one of our collaborators, send an email to bw.editor@sh.se.