contributors

Helmut Müller-Enbergs & Thomas Wegener Friis

Helmut Müller-Enbergs is adj. professor, University of Southern Denmark; Guestprofessor,
University of Gotland; Senior Researcher The agency of the Federal Commissioner for the Stasi records (BStU).

Thomas Wegener Friis is associate professor and network coordinator at the Centre for Cold War at the Department for History and Civilization, University of Southern Denmark

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Articles by Helmut Müller-Enbergs & Thomas Wegener Friis

  1. Inside Russia. The Finnish dimension

    Kivinen, Markku & Humphreys, Brendan (eds.). (London and New York: Routledge 2021). xxv and 368 pages.

  2. A homage to the beauty of two hundred Baltic Sea lighthouses. A coffee table book rich with photos

    Fyrar runt Östersjön. [Lighthouses around the Baltic Sea] Magnus Rietz, (Stockholm: Lind & Co, 2019), 415 pages

  3. Conservative national narratives in Poland, Russia and Hungary. “We are the norm!”

    New Conservatives in Russia and East Central Europe. Eds. Katharina Bluhm and Mihai Varga (London: Routledge, 2019), 309 pages.

  4. Exploring modern urbanity through the public-private dichotomy. The case of a divided Berlin

    At the Edge of the Wall: Public and Private Spheres in Divided Berlin, Hanno Hochmuth, (Berghahn Books: New York, 2021), 358 pages.

  5. Reforming Child Welfare in the Post-Soviet Space. Institutional Change in Russia

    The deinstitutionalization as a policy shift introduced an entirely new principle of care in contemporary Russia. It brought the right to live in a family to the center of the care system, seeing residential, collective care as being harmful to children. The analysis shows that children left without family and placed in institutional care are mainly “social orphans”, meaning that their parents are alive but deprived of parental rights.

  6. 60 years after the plane crash: A New reading of Dag Hammarskjöld’s diary Markings

    From 1958, the lyric character of the diary entries becomes more intense. On the other hand they gain a further dimension of universality. They can be interpreted as saying that he would like the personal to remain even less known, and that the poeticizing is a means of concealment. Both may be equally true. If Markings were a fictional diary, one might say that the foreshadowing of death was a structural feature

  7. Aesthetics as Technique and Spatial Occupation in Hybrid Political Regimes

    The essay presents a new reflection on aesthetics within the wider understanding of the role of political rhythms in hybrid regimes. Aesthetics and politics “are not two permanent and separate realities about which it might be asked if they must be put in relation to one another”. On the contrary, the argument the author proposes in this essay presents an idea of how a political establishment disposes a new set of spatial practices through the field of aesthetics.

  8. Traumatic Contemporaneity Reflections on Piotr Piotrowski’s Critical Museography

    This essay analyses two texts by the Polish art historian Piotr Piotrowski (1952–2015) articulating theoretical stances towards art museography. Reflecting on how they deal with psychological as well as openly political issues, I interpret and assess their joint contribution to the broader interdisciplinary field of (critical) museography. The texts are “New Museums in New Europe” and “Making the National Museum Critical”. Together the texts developed Piotrowski’s concept of “the critical museum” as a way of dealing with the challenges of running an old national art museum based on masterpieces while also striving to engage with pressing contemporary issues. which is a prerequisite for critical intervention.

  9. Feminist Comic Art is spreading in the Baltic Sea Region

    Feminist comic art in Sweden, Finland, and the Baltic Sea region raises the question of whether it is possible to find a common denominator for feminist comic art. Are feminist comics connected by certain aesthetic qualities or themes? Is there a shared conception of feminism that is recognizable in the comics produced in the Baltic Sea region? The answer to both questions is ”no”. As much as there is an exchange of ideas and aesthetic influences between artists in different countries, there are local varieties specific to countries and individual artists. Furthermore, variations in contemporary conceptions of feminism seem to depend on varying historical conditions and experiences in the different countries.

  10. MEMORY BATTLEFIELD ON THE EAST FRONT: UKRAINE AND POLAND

    Discussions about the assessment of historic events have always had their place in the public discourse in democratic societies, whereas totalitarian regimes such as the Communist one preferred an official version of history that is not up for debate. This is why a conflict-prone memory boom in the CEE was to be expected after the fall of the Iron Curtain. The only recently intensified trend is to fight memory wars with the means of memory laws, i.e. by using laws prescribing and proscribing certain representations of historic events as a weapon to protect one’s national collective memory from divergent interpretation by others. Such approach to governing memory wars are detrimental to the neighborly relations, i.e. turning them into un-neighborly ones.

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