contributors

Julia Malitska, Olena Podolian & Yuliya Yurchuk

Yuliya Yurchuk, PhD in history, CBEES, Södertörn University. She conducts memory studies in Ukraine, and focus on the representations of the past and their effects on the present and future. Julia Malitska is doctoral student in history at School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Södertörn University and examines Russia’s imperialism and colonization of Azov and Black Sea region in the 19th century. Olena Podolian is a doctoral student in political science at Södertörn University and studies regime change, challenges for democracy and state-building in former Soviet countries with a focus on Ukraine and Estonia.

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Articles by Julia Malitska, Olena Podolian & Yuliya Yurchuk

  1. Trailer Russian Revolution 100 years

  2. Breakin’ Revolution

    We believed that a conference on arts and aesthetics is hardly imaginable without a cultural program and therefore included one, comprising a dance performance, Breakin’ Revolution, on the opening night at Färgfabriken on October 19, and a public screening of the art film To The New Horizons at the closing session at Moderna Museet on October 21, conceptually marking the beginning and the end of the Russian Revolution.

  3. Presidential elections Kyrgyzstan 2017. Peaceful in most regions except Osh city

    Among the twelve candidates who ran for the presidency in Kyrgystan, three were particularly important: Temir Sariev, Sooronbai Jeenbekov, and Omurbek Babanov. The turn-out was almost 56 percent of 3 million eligible voters. The elections went peacefully in most regions of Kyrgyzstan except Osh city, where half of the inhabitants belong to Uzbek ethnic groups.

  4. The 2017 Parliamentary Elections in Bulgaria:  Stabilizing the Status Quo and Normalizing the Far Right

    The main takeaway from the outcome of Bulgaria’s parliamentary elections in March 2017 is that stability has replaced relative instability. Nevertheless, the last elections have ushered in the possibility of democratic backsliding and increasing authoritarian rule in Bulgaria. In this sense Bulgaria fits within a regional trend. It should also be underlined that the far right managed to do what the ever-quarrelling urban middle class and mainly conservative milieu could not: namely unite and secure enough of a vote to become Borisov's junior partner in government.

  5. The inverted myth Viktor Pelevin’s Buddha’s little finger

    In his contribution to the volume Russian Literature since 1991 entitled “The Postmodernist Novel”, Mark Lipovetsky makes the now rather widespread claim that the Russian postmodernist post-Soviet novel represents a break with the totalizing tendencies of the socialist realist novel and opens for new ways of experiencing and conceptualizing the world. In this paper this claim is critically examined on the basis of a reading of Viktor Pelevin's Chapaev i Pustota (transl. as Buddha’s Little Finger or Clay Machine Gun against the backdrop of contemporary debates about realism and simulacra. Here it is argued that the Soviet myth of Chapaev lends itself to the totality of the private myth.

  6. Norm-breaking female soldiers. Russian revolutionary heores

    Låt oss dö som hjältar: kvinnliga soldater i revolutionens Ryssland [Let us die as heroes: Female soldiers in the Russia of the Revolution and the Civil War] Per Enerud, Carlsson Bokförlag 2014, 275 pages.

  7. Mickey Mouse – the perfect tenant of an early Soviet city

    The article provides a closer reading of Walter Benjamin’s essays Experience and Poverty and Moscow, by juxtaposing the records of his visit to Russia in 1926–1927 with the author’s reflections on the nature of the transformations in the urban space of an early Soviet city. By using the dystopian image of Mickey Mouse as the desired inhabitant of modernity introduced by Benjamin in Experience and Poverty, Seits gives the allegorical and comparative interpretation to the substantial changes in the living space of Moscow that were witnessed by Walter Benjamin.

  8. Transnational and cosmopolitan families. Exploring diversity among migrants

    Viorela Ducu and Áron Telegdi-Csetri, Managing “Difference” in Eastern-European Transnational Families. Peter Lang: Frankfurt am Main, 2016, 190 pages.

  9. Revolutionary Synchrony: A Day of the World

    A Day of the World (Den’ mira) was a documentary volume, published in 1937, that was intended to provide a snapshot of the entire globe on a single day, September 27, 1935. The tensions within and around A Day of the World capture some of the basic contradictions in socialist realism, the official aesthetic method of Soviet art: between publicity and intimacy and between the dream of synchronous, global revolution and the aberrant temporalities of individual experience.

  10. Russia, Norway and the Arctic. Challenges to security policies

    Geir Hønneland, Russia and the Arctic. Environment, Identity and Security political challenges. London and New York: I.B. Tauris, 2016, 205 pages; Tormod Heier og Anders Kjølberg (red.). Norge og Russland. Sikkerhets-politiske utfordringer i nordom-rådene. [Norway and Russia. Security Polices in the Northern Areas], Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2015, 208 pages.

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