contributors

Kevin Deegan-Krause & Tim Haughton

Kevin Deegan-Krause is Associate Professor of Political Science at Wayne State University.  He is the author of Elected Affinities: Democracy and Party Competition in Slovakia and the Czech Republic (2006) and co-editor of The Structure of Political Competition in Western Europe (2010) and the Handbook of Political Change in Eastern Europe (forthcoming), and the co-editor of the European Journal of Political Research’s Political Data Yearbook

Tim Haughton is Senior Lecturer in the Politics of Central and Eastern Europe at the University of Birmingham and the 2011-12 Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Fellow at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. He is the author of Constraints and Opportunities of Leadership in Post-Communist Europe (2005), the editor of Party Politics in Central and Eastern Europe: Does EU Membership Matter? (2011) and the co-editor of the Journal of Common Market Studies’ Annual Review of the European Union.   

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Articles by Kevin Deegan-Krause & Tim Haughton

  1. The revision of Herstory. Global state socialist women’s activism from a new perspective

    Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War. Kristen Ghodsee. Duke University Press, 2019, 328 pages.

  2. Linking gender and food in the late Soviet context Narratives, discourses, representations

    Seasoned Socialism: Gender and Food in Late Soviet Everyday Life , Ed. by Anastasia Lakhtikova, Angela Brintlinger, and Irina Glushchenko. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2019, 396 pages

  3. The Chernobyl disaster. From the explosion to the closing of the plant

    Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy, Serhii Plokhy, Penguin (2019), 432 pages, Winner of the Baillie Gifford Prize 2018

  4. Missing people, missing times: The Internet, archaeology, and the spectacular

    We are, as my examples show, tricked into believing that archaeological research, museum practices, and the digitalization of museum objects, archived material, and so on will make a secret world more open and transparent and that this will be positive for the public, democracy, and for the scientific community. The real world is, however, much more dynamic and diverse but always out of reach for the public because of our naïve desire for the Internet. Archive and museum activities are a practice done in reality, not on the Internet, and so is research.

  5. On the production and suspension of time

    More than anything else, the avant-garde is the area of the production of the past: the colossal amounts of memoirs, artefacts, and photographs that are accumulated in archives — in different kinds of archives, including personal ones, but also state archives, and many others of different kinds.

  6. “There is no heritage”

    Irina Sandomirskaja in a conversation with philosophers Jean-Luc Nancy and Peter Trawny on the subject of nationalism and cultural heritage.

  7. The Heritage of the Missing Some remarks from an international law perspective

    There is an emerging regime of international law for protecting cultural heritage that focuses on three things: (1) conflict resolution between disputing parties, (2) safe return of cultural objects to legitimate claimants, and (3) criminal justice meted out to individuals who have acted in bad faith, mala fide.

  8. The missing of history in heritage H.G. Adler's novel The Wall

    The property of the disappeared first becomes mere “things” without name, use, or status. Then they turn into museum artifacts of ethnographic, aesthetic, or historical value (at least those of them that are not stolen by the “conquerors” nor rejected by the experts). Then, again, with the collapse of the museum project, what used to be displayed as cultural heritage turns again into “just things”. They burden their custodians who only wish to get rid of them.

  9. Introduction. The property of missing persons Cultural heritage, value, and historical justice

    In general, social disasters always result in the disproportionate excess of things: while humans perish en masse, artifacts survive in the form of market commodities and museum exhibit; as human life extinguishes in catastrophes, the life of objects gets more and more active in market exchanges, expropriations, and lootings. The history of Eastern Europe in the 20th century has witnessed many such episodes.

  10. Beyond spatial and cultural boundaries in Riga

    Expressions such as “geographical imaginaries” and “utopic worlds” are used to lead people to dream about distant lands, very different from Latvian society and its cultural scene. Based on these premises, the role of the Survival Kit Festival is to bring these imaginaries close to contemporary society in Riga, leading to a transformation of the conception of geographical and mental borders.

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