Sofie Bedford and Ulyana Kaposhka

Sofie Bedford has a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stockholm University. Currently she is a researcher at Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Uppsala University (UCRS) and affiliated with the Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul. Her main ongoing project focuses on the concept of ‘opposition’ in electoral authoritarian states. Sofie is a part of Baltic Worlds Scientific Advisory Council and she is the contact person for the online election coverage.
Ulyana Kaposhka holds a Master of Science in International and European Relations from Linköping University, Sweden. Her main research interests include societal and political development in the post-Soviet countries, specifically Belarus and Russia, as well as conflict dynamics in the South Caucasus. Ulyana is currently an intern at Uppsala Centre for Russian and European Studies, Uppsala University, where she works with Dr. Sofie Bedford within the project ‘Building Sustainable Opposition in Electoral Authoritarian Regimes’ (2015-2017).

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Articles by Sofie Bedford and Ulyana Kaposhka

  1. Belarus Parliamentary Elections 2016. Something Old Something New

    The European willingness to interact with Belarus at any cost and Lukashenko’s interest in maintaining such interaction can be, and has become already to some extent, some kind of window of opportunity. Even though it does not change the fact that political decision making is only conducted top-down, as such completely inaccessible not only for the general public but for the house of representatives as well this new ‘thaw’ is seemingly bringing with it some more room for maneuvering.

  2. The 2016 Russian elections. postponing the future

    The outcome of the 2016 Duma elections further consolidates the Russian authoritarian system. The changes in the electoral legislation resulting in the reintroduction of the mixed voting system could, in theory, have helped open up the system to other parties. This did not prove to be the case, however, as it instead favoured Putin’s current constellation of power.


    On October 2 at the upcoming Hungarian referendum voters are expected to give a “yes” or “no” answer to the following question: “Do you want to allow the European Union to mandate the obligatory resettlement of non-Hungarian citizens in Hungary without the approval of [the Hungarian] Parliament?”

  4. Contradicting national narratives of Riga. A city through its streets

    Andreas Fülberth, Riga: Kleine Geschichte der Stadt, Cologne: Böhlau Verlag, 2014

  5. Phantom borders in Europe. A fluid phenomenon

    “Phantom Borders in the Political Geography of East Central Europe”, Erdkunde 69, no. 2 (2015), ed. Sabine von Löwis

  6. Art as the venue for politics. The image of Rossiya 2

    Lena Jonson, Art and Protest in Putin’s Russia. London and New York: Routledge 2015, 399 pages.

  7. One in a thousand. An ordinary extraordinary woman

    Helmut Müssener, Wolfgang Wilhelmus: Stettin Lublin Stockholm. Elsa Meyring: Aus dem Leben einer deutschen Nichtarierin im zwanzig-sten Jahr-hundert., 2nd edition. Rostock: Ingo Koch Verlag, 2014.

  8. On the frontlines of disinformation. Academic packaging of old stereotypes

    Richard Sakwa, Frontlinje Ukraina: Krisen i gränslandet mellan Ryssland och Europeiska unionen; Frontline Ukraine: Crisis in the Borderlands, Karneval förlag; London: I. B. Tauris, 2015, 349 pages

  9. Hungary The constitution of the “political” in squatting

    This paper presents the constitution of the “political” in two cases of political squatting in Hungary after 1989: the Centrum squatter group’s occupations in 2004–2006, and the homeless advocacy group The City is for All’s occupations in 2013–2014.

  10. Vilnius Giving meaning to abandoned buildings

    This paper explores the scope, causes, flourishing, and decline of squatting in Lithuanian society during the period of 1990-2002. Drawing on 16 in-depth interviews conducted with squatters in Vilnius, newspaper articles and legal documents, this paper shows that squatters made contributions to the city with their cultural capital, creating local subcultures and making the urban space more attractive.

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