contributors

Valter Bolevics, Jan Sjölin and Tatjana Volkova

Valters Bolevis is PhD Oec. Can. in business administration, Riga International School of Economics and Business Administration. Project manager. MS with distinction cum laude in the field of transport and maritime management from Institute of Transport and Maritime Management (ITMMA), Belgium, 2007.

Jan Sjölin is associate professor at the Baltic International Academy (BIA in Riga) and emeritus at the Technical University of IASI (CETEX). Served within the inner circle of CEEMAN (the Central and Eastern European Management Development Association) dealing with transition and evaluation of academic institutions.

Tatjana Volkova is professor in strategic management and innovation management and former rector of BA School of Business and Finance, Latvia. Her special research interests are design-driven innovations and creative industries. She is among other things a former President of Rector’s Conference of Latvia (2004—2011) and a former member of the European University Association Council.

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Articles by Valter Bolevics, Jan Sjölin and Tatjana Volkova

  1. In Poland, COVID-19 exposes progressing societal militarization

    As Poland lifts restrictions and comes out of the lockdown ensued by COVID-19, much has been said on what the pandemic has revealed about our economy, public institutions, gender relations, and state of democratic checks and balances. What has been less discussed, yet not gone unnoticed, is the way this security crisis has revealed ongoing processes of societal militarization, and the shift of society-military relations towards closer ties and interactions. Just like the war in Ukraine and the Refugee Crisis, Covid-19 has further normalized bringing the Polish society into defense through militarized channels. However, a closer look reveals the potential for shifting this process into more civilian-based forms.

  2. Latvia’s e-parliament does it from a distance

    The Covid-19 pandemic created the need to find a new way for 100 Latvian MP’s to debate and pass laws without sitting side-by-side in their historical parliamentary hall. A new e-system now enables Latvian MP’s to perform their legislative functions from anywhere they have an Internet connection.

  3. Poland. Elections with no ballots

    Presidential elections were formally held in Poland on Sunday, May 10, 2020, but in practice no election took place and no ballots were cast. The distinction between what happens formally and what takes place in practice has become more and more important for Polish politics and public life.

  4. The pandemic experience and the lockdown in Albania

    We can all agree that this pandemic is hard to manage and that the saving citizens’ life is the most important issue to deal with initially, but let us reflect on the consequences of the responses. The pandemic experience and the lockdown in Albania, among other perspectives, can be analysed by answering two main questions: 1. What is the socio-economic cost of the lockdown for almost 3 months? 2. What are the implications for the democratic system, is the freedom challenged?

  5. Baltic Worlds’ Online Coverage: “The Impacts of the Pandemic”

    Baltic Worlds’ website is publishing comments from different countries and regions on the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. There will be contributions from several countries, more to expect soon. Baltic Worlds' Online Coverage will examine how politicians in different parts of the world are reacting to the crisis. Some are using the crisis to promote authoritarian or illiberal policies. Restrictions have been enacted to protect vulnerable groups from Covid-19, but the consequences and costs are hard to estimate, not only economically; we know that domestic violence has increased, and other side effects are also open to discussion. Is work to combat the pandemic eroding democracy? People have fewer tools than ever for making their voices heard, defending human rights, or crossing borders. What will the outcome be?

  6. Tajikistan’s Fake Election

    Unsurprisingly, the ruling People’s Democratic Party, won Tajikistan’s parliamentary elections on March 1, 2020. The election campaign was a muted affair. No previous Tajik election has been judged free and fair by legitimate international observers. The Central Election Commission stated that the elections were open and transparent, and reported that it received no reports of violations. But independent observers reported a slew of violations, including ballot stuffing and proxy voting.

  7. Slovak Parliamentary Elections 2020:  Drugs, Computer Games and Islamophobia

    On Sunday March 1, Slovakia woke up to a new political era. Slovaks showed to former ruling parties (SMER – SD, Slovak National Party and the Bridge) that there were fed up with their empty promises and all the corruption, scandals and nepotism. They decided to give a chance to Matovič and some of the other opposition parties.

  8. Feminists revisit the breakups and breakthrough of 1989

    Conversation with Slavenka Drakulić, Croatia; Samirah Kenawi, Germany; Tamara Hundorova, Ukraine; Ewa Kulik-Bielińska, Poland; and Olga Lipovskaia, Russia.

  9. “Almost every nationally-defined state turned autocratic and anti-pluralistic”

    Kristina Jõekalda and Linda Kaljundi in a conversation with Joep Leerssen on past and present nationalism in Europe and beyond. Joep Leerssen, Professor of European Studies at the University of Amsterdam, is one of the leading scholars of nationalism, having initiated several innovative projects and produced influential texts in the field.

  10. Talking about the past and future of the Baltic states

    The theme of this year’s conference, the 13th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe (CBSE) was “Baltic Solidarity” — and most appropriate, no one less than Lech Wałęsa was there to open the event.

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