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2014. After Maidan 2.0

Baltic Worlds publishes comments and opinions on the recent situation, since Maidan 2.0!

Please add a comment yourself, or send a mail to bw.editor@sh.se.

Note: The content in commentaries expresses the views of the authors and does not necessarily reflect the views of Baltic Worlds.

RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN INFORMATION WARS OVER THE MEANINGS OF WWII

During the May 25 presidential election, the leaders of Svoboda and the Right sector had only 1, 7 percent of support. This is, according to Lyudmyla Pavlyuk, professor in journalism in Ukraine, an argument that the Russian official propaganda about Ukraine’s “fascism” is a way to legitimize Russian policies of occupation and aggression.

By Lyudmyla Pavlyuk 0 Comments

GAMES FROM THE PAST: THE CONTINUITY AND CHANGE OF THE IDENTITY DYNAMIC IN DONBAS FROM A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

The ambiguity of the 1920s Ukrainianization is well known among its scholars. A curious fact is that was becoming less intense and effective where the initial positions of the Ukrainian were weaker. Donbas was specifically one such region. If Ukraine is a borderland, Donbas is a borderland multiplied by itself, notes the author and further claims that ”Donbas will retain its hybridity no matter the outcome of the current unrest. Still, the volatile situation brings not only risks but also yet another chance for belated modernisation.”

By Roman Horbyk 0 Comments

PARALLEL WORLDS IN UKRAINE

BECAUSE OF THE direct Russian intervention, the territorial integrity and independence of the Ukrainian state is at stake. But as long as business and politics are as intimately intertwined as they are today, any serious reform in Ukraine in line with the ideological foundation of the protest movement will be a an exceptionally challenging task.

By Hanna Söderbaum 0 Comments

MUSIC OF THE REVOLUTION: FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS?

It is difficult to identify why Maidan took a violent, military turn. Among the main possible reasons we might first note the inability of three opposition leaders (namely Vitaliy Klychko, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, and Oleh Tyahnybok) to settle on just one Maidan leader, and the absence of any visible, concrete accession to the demands of the protesters by the authorities.

By Alla Marchenko Sergiy Kurbatov 0 Comments

COMMENTS ON THE CURRENT EVENTS IN UKRAINE

”Euromaidan is an anti-amnesia action of a postcolonial nation aimed against a restored post-Soviet space”, posts Lyudmyla Pavlyuk, professor in journalism in Ukraine.

By Lyudmyla Pavlyuk 1 Comment

MESSAGE FROM UKRAINE

A message on situation in Ukraine from Ukrainian writer Yuri Andrukhovych. (translated by Vitaly Chernetsky, via Andrij Bondar)

By Yuri Andrukhovych 1 Comment

TO PREVENT THE ESCALATION OF VIOLENCE IN UKRAINE

Maidan 2.0. Letter from the Ukrainian PEN Club, Kyiv January 22 2014.

By Mykola Riabchuk 1 Comment

MAIDAN 2.0

Maidan 2.0. Letter from Kyiv the 10th of December 2013.

By Mykola Riabchuk 0 Comments

2013. Pussy Riot

In this text (conversation) it is suggested that the greatest crisis of social consensus that the Pussy Riot action produced, and the deepest collective anxiety that surfaced in the discussion, was the fear of the active and politically conscious woman, a woman who does not hesitate to use violence in claiming her subjectivity from the authority of the church, the family, the establishment, or the state. Concerning one principal issue, the public opinion was especially dramatically polarized, and that is what the three authors want to look closer at, namely, Pussy Riot’s feminist agenda.

By Yulia Gradskova Irina Sandomirskaja Nadezda Petrusenko

”This text is not an analytical article, nor a proper academic paper, but rather a conversation, a dialogue for three voices. It was originally presented at a seminar at Södertörn university and it has no intention of summing up things in any definitive way. On the contrary, we were writing about our observations in a free manner, discussing with each other in the process, reflecting on the critique from our colleagues, and commenting on each other contributions, supporting or questioning each other’s points of view in an informal manner. These mutual comments are linked to the text below in suitable places and marked with our initials. We are also including some pictures that we thought we needed for our presentations and that were very difficult to select in the ocean of visual images illustrating the case of Pussy Riot and the public’s reaction to it. After having produced about forty pages, we realized we have to stop if we do not want this conversation to continue indefinitely. But we do not consider that it is over. We hope that it will be continued by our readers.”

Read the text and all comments here.>>

2012. European Football Championship

Baltic Worlds did monitor the European Football Championship in June 2012 here on Baltic Worlds’ website.

A number of articles were published during the ongoing European Championship, in which 16 nations play 31 matches in eight different cities in Poland and Ukraine: Gdańsk, Poznan, Wroclaw, Warsaw, Lviv, Kiev, Kharkiv and Donetsk.

What does co-hosting the European Football Championship mean for the two countries’ relationship? How has  their cooperation functioned? What is the Championship’s importance for the countries’ economies, as well as  those of the affected cities? What happens when the European Football Championship arrives in the city? Or when  football supporters from throughout Europe come to Ukraine and Poland? These are a few of the questions that  will be covered by CBEES’ article series about the European Football Championship.

Kutte Jönsson, senior lecturer in Practical Philosophy at Malmö University, write on sport and politics, from an ethical approach.>>

Tove Stenquist, journalist, provides a background to the historic relationship between Poland and Ukraine  through a conversation between Volodymyr Kulyk (Ukrainian Studies, Stanford University, USA) and Jacek  Nowak (Jagellonian University, Kraków, Poland).>>

Nicholas Aylott, Associate Professor in Political Science and a research leader at CBEES, Södertörn University,  writes about social classes and football.>>

Yuliya Yurchuk, doctoral student in History at BEEGS, Södertörn University, with roots in Ukraine, writes about  feminist initiatives for counteracting increased prostitution in association with the event: ”Football Against Sex  Tourism and Prostitution?”.>>

Lars Johannsen, associate professor in political science, University of Aarhus, writes about corruption and the  European Football Championship’s impact on the local economy ”The dividend of UEFA EURO 2012: Corruption  in the shadow of soccer tournaments” .>>

Mike Dennis, professor of modern German history, University of Wolverhampton, UK, about the Cold War in the GDR and football ”DOoping in East German football since the mid-1960s”. >>

Ann-Cathrine Jungar, associate professor in political science at CBEES, Södertörn University, writes about racism and xenophobia in connection with the European Football Championship. >>

Further information about Baltic Worlds monitoring the European Championship in football, please contact  Ninna Mörner, editor Baltic Worlds: mailto:bw.editor@sh.se

Download links  here.>>