Commentaries

Role-play. European Integration with a Focus on the Baltic Sea Region

The 30th anniversary celebration of the Council of the Baltic Sea States is an opportunity to strengthen the long-term priority […]

By Zane Šime January 18, 2023

What happened to the Russian Fashion Mafia?

After the years of Covid closure, when the world was making socializing a possibility once more, Putin attacked Ukraine in February 2022. This meant controversies about how Russians are seen in all industries, including in fashion. So, what has happened to the Russian Fashion Mafia?

By Karin Winroth January 18, 2023

Olena Zelenska on the cover of Vogue; ”criticized and praised”

Even though it is not uncommon for first ladies of various countries to be pictured on the cover of Vogue, this time it stirred some concern. There have been heated discussions on social media. Why does the most prestigious fashion magazine in the world offer their front cover to a first lady defending her country, a country unknown for its design and fashion? And why does she accept? There were considerable discussions on the matter and Zelenska has been both criticized and praised for taking this opportunity.

By Karin Winroth January 18, 2023

Sovereignty and loneliness on Snake Island

The concept presented by Bloodlands includes a particular state of being at the mercy of the cultural landscape, which has a complex imprint — of history, politics, socialization. I saw the task of my generation to be the “liberation” of this landscape, a performative healing of my country, where the process of coming to terms with the bloody past would have coexist with the development of solidary and non-violent cohabitation. Today’s war of annihilation has torn not only my generation, but also the older and younger generations from their previous lives and brought them down to the bloody ground.

By Kateryna Mishchenko January 18, 2023

Staying in Kyiv. “A country that has such heroic young men is a powerful country”

On March 24, I visited the military hospital in Kyiv together with my colleagues from one Kyiv publishing house. That was very important for me as I saw the “inner” world of the war of young soldiers injured. Many of them suffer in terrible pain after surgery as there is a shortage of painkiller medication.

By Dmytro Drozdovskyi June 22, 2022

Many Ukrainian children have left home. Some displaced children end up in Lviv

During the first month of the war, more than half of the children in Ukraine left their homes. Many of those who came out of hell arrived in the relatively calmer west of Ukraine as well as to neighboring European countries. Some were displaced after weeks of hiding in basements, dilapidated houses, in cars or even lines of vehicles under the enemy fire.

By Lyudmyla Pavlyuk June 22, 2022

Reforming Child Welfare in the Post-Soviet Space. Institutional Change in Russia

The deinstitutionalization as a policy shift introduced an entirely new principle of care in contemporary Russia. It brought the right to live in a family to the center of the care system, seeing residential, collective care as being harmful to children. The analysis shows that children left without family and placed in institutional care are mainly “social orphans”, meaning that their parents are alive but deprived of parental rights.

By Anna Tarasenko and Meri Kulmala October 25, 2021

Gender hate

The groups that drive the idea of a dangerous, destructive gender ideology are well organised and are gaining ground, but there are also counter movements that are growing stronger, the author argues.

By Anna-Maria Sörberg May 26, 2020

Doing feminism in times of anti-gender mobilizations

The authors argue that the current situation of neoliberal capitalism, nationalism, anti-feminism, and racism poses similar (but not identical) threats in different parts of the world, which in turn structures parallel but locally performed resistance. Efforts to create feminist unity in the name of gender studies across different sets of borders also inevitably unveils the cracks and differences dividing feminist communities.

By Katarina Giritli-Nygren and Angelika Sjöstedt Landén May 26, 2020

Ni Una Menos – not one woman less How feminism could become a popular struggle

Ni Una Menos (literally meaning “Not one less”, standing for “not one woman less”) is the signifier that has become the name of a whole popular feminist movement.

By Paula Biglieri May 25, 2020