contributors

Alexandra Dmitrieva and Zhanna Kravchenko

Alexandra Dmitrieva, PhD in sociology, currently working as an expert for several grassroots NGOs specializing in groundwork with drug. Previously a researcher at the Department of Sociology, St. Petersburg State University.
Zhanna Kravchenko, Associate professor in sociology and senior lecturer in social work at the School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University. Research focus: public policies in Russia and Sweden.

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Articles by Alexandra Dmitrieva and Zhanna Kravchenko

  1. Jan Grabowski’s research is facing a lawsuit in Poland. New book on the Polish Police during WWII

    On the Watchpost. The complicity of the Polish and Polish Criminal Police in the Holocaust. Review of Na posterunku. Udział polskiej policji granatowej i kryminalnej w zagładzie Żydów Jan Grabowski 432 pages. Wydawnictwo Czarne, Wolowiec 2020.

  2. Geopolitics, genetics and genocide. Small seeds in world history

    Den stora fröstölden. Svält, plundring och mord i växt-förädlingens århundrade [The Great Seed Theft. Famine, starvation and murder in the century of plant breeding.] Jens Nordquist. (Lund: Historiska media, 2020), 333 pages.

  3. The Nobel Prize and Russia

    Russia’s relationship with the Nobel Prize in literature has always been dramatic. This, of course, is connected with the enormous and fundamental role the Word has played in Russian society. Contributing to the fascination surrounding the prize is surely the fact that the Nobel family, some of whom even spoke Russian, had such close ties to Russia.

  4. A Swedish outpost in St. Petersburg. The Church of Sweden and St. Catherine’s  Lutheran Church in St. Petersburg. Post-Soviet memory politics from a church historical perspective

    The formation of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran congregation in St. Petersburg had consequences for the Church of Sweden and for Swedish foreign policy. The aim of this article is to problematize the actions of the Church of Sweden and the Swedish state in connection with the revival of the Lutheran congregations on Soviet territory toward the end of the Cold War. The article combines the study of cultural memories with theories derived from research that focuses on spatial location and materiality.

  5. The case of Yurii Dmitriev and the case of Russian Karelia

    This commentary aims to provide a context for the Dmitriev “affair” by presenting Karelia, its people, its history and its economic and political development. At the end of the text, some comparative conclusions for Russia in general are drawn. The commentary is primarily based on Russian press and official material, as well as on Finnish research.

  6. Nuclear Superpowers Art, culture, and heritage in the Nuclear Age

    Eglė Rindzevičiūtė talks to Ele Carpenter about the strong correlation between the experience of imperialism and colonial power, high technology and cultural responsibility.

  7. The protests in Belarus and the future of the LGBTQ+ community

    In the ongoing protests in Belarus against Alexander Lukashenka and the sitting regime, the LGBTQ+ community walks alongside other demonstrators, with a common wish to see a regime change.

  8. Faces of Russia’s empire. The Bergholtz collection of ethnographic images from the early 18th century

    The Division of Prints and Drawings of the Swedish National Museum contains a collection with just over 200 hand painted images of the peoples of the Russian Empire which, up to the present time, has been largely unknown to scholars. The images, dating from the first half of the 18th century, are associated with the name of Friedrich Wilhelm Bergholtz (1699–1772) a courtier and collector who served as a tutor to the Grand Duke Petr Fedorovich (the future Peter III). In this article, the authors describe the contents of the collection, consider its' possible origin, and assess its significance, particularly with regard to its depictions of Siberian peoples and Ukrainians.

  9. Shara Zhienkulova as the “femina Sovietica”. Emanicipation in Stalinist Kazakhstan

    This article explores the potential of the Kazakh “model woman” narrative in the context of the socio-cultural perspectives of Stalinism in traditional oriental societies. In her well-written memoirs, Shara Zhienkulova, founder of the Kazakh dance school, reconstructs personal accounts of the Bolshevik cultural modernization project, through the introduction of new cultural practices and her own hard-won battle for a place in the new Soviet culture. We argue here that while her body served the regime as a kinesthetic mediator for the projected ideological imperatives to be oriented on European style – in the Soviet manner – her soul and mind remained (as containers of personal and ethnic memory) ethnic Kazakh in nature. Through her memoirs Shara Zhienkulova intended to leave not only a name but also a voice in the Kazakh culture, recounting the inner world and thoughts of subaltern women.

  10. The Janus of Russian modernization. Discussions at the 3rd Cultural Forum of the Regions of Russia

    The growing sector of heritage industry and creative uses of the past in Russia illustrate that, besides the undeniable existence of restorative nostalgia, there are other, more progressive forms of nostalgia that address social change and the protection of heritage sites.

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