Nation building

12 articles tagged with nation building were found.

Shara Zhienkulova as the “femina Sovietica”. Emanicipation in Stalinist Kazakhstan

This article explores the potential of the Kazakh “model woman” narrative in the context of the socio-cultural perspectives of Stalinism in traditional oriental societies. In her well-written memoirs, Shara Zhienkulova, founder of the Kazakh dance school, reconstructs personal accounts of the Bolshevik cultural modernization project, through the introduction of new cultural practices and her own hard-won battle for a place in the new Soviet culture. We argue here that while her body served the regime as a kinesthetic mediator for the projected ideological imperatives to be oriented on European style – in the Soviet manner – her soul and mind remained (as containers of personal and ethnic memory) ethnic Kazakh in nature. Through her memoirs Shara Zhienkulova intended to leave not only a name but also a voice in the Kazakh culture, recounting the inner world and thoughts of subaltern women.

By Didar Kassymova and Elmira Teleuova April 22, 2021

The Janus of Russian modernization. Discussions at the 3rd Cultural Forum of the Regions of Russia

The growing sector of heritage industry and creative uses of the past in Russia illustrate that, besides the undeniable existence of restorative nostalgia, there are other, more progressive forms of nostalgia that address social change and the protection of heritage sites.

By Ekaterina Kalinina April 21, 2021

THE NATION THAT’S US DIVERGENT INTERPRETATIONS OF A CONCEPT

The concept of nation is not only, as is often assumed, related to states but to the people who feel that they belong to a community based on a common identity, wherein language and culture are often emphasized as something that knit people together. History, as well as contemporary experience, reveal the notion that state nationalism tends to oppress local languages and cultures. However, in a cultural nation interpretation, all national minorities, while being citizens of their state of domicile, are per definition not members of the majority nationality.

Essay by Thomas Lundén February 20, 2020

The EU as a Normative Success for National Minorities Before and after the EU enlargement

The main reason why we have not seen more severe conflicts between majorities and minorities in the new EU member states is, in the authors view, the EU’s success as a normative power. The pressure that the EU put on the candidates for membership to adapt to norms on minority protection and to solve their potential border conflicts had a positive effect.

By Barbara Törnquist-Plewa & Magdalena Góra January 21, 2015

Carbon and cultural heritage The politics of history and the economics of rent

The author argues that the equation of culture and natural resources has become a fundamental metaphor of the official patriotic discourse of identity in contemporary Russia. This conceptualization of the past frames nation building and state construction, the “nostalgic modernization”.

By Ilya Kalinin October 20, 2014

creating the IDEAL CITIZEN A comparison of Swedish and Estonian practical housing policy in the postwar era

Like many other modern states, both the Soviet Union, with its authoritian socialism, and Sweden, with its social democracy, strived to shape their citizens' lives for the better. Both states considered it their duty actively to plan, organize and control housing.

By Jenny Björkman & Johan Eellend October 20, 2014

nation-building À la russe How Putin’s government is educating the Russian elites of tomorrow

The nationally organized camp Seliger All-Russia Youth Forum gathers tens of thousands of young Russians every year. Here a report from the inside of the camp, observations in contemporary nation-building.

By Kristiina Silvan October 18, 2014

A European Russia or a Russian Europe

Is Russia part of Europe? Russians answer this question in different ways. For many of them, Russia is not Europe but Eurasia, which is an alternate unit of civilization. I do not share this opinion, writes Adam Michnik here.

By Adam Michnik May 13, 2011

Reflections on the historiography of a reactionary era

Andrei Zubov, (ed. and author), Istoriia Rossii, XX vek. 1894–1939, Istoriia Rossii, XX vek. 1939–2007, [The history of Russia: The 20th century. 1894– 1939; The history of Russia: The 20th century. 1939–2007] Moscow: Astrel 2009, 1,023+829 pages

By Lennart Samuelson July 1, 2010

Expelled and expeller. On the reality of forced migration

+ Andreas Kossert. Kalte Heimat: Die Geschichte der deutschen Vertriebenen nach 1945. München: Siedler 2008. 427 pages.

+ Jan Musekamp. Zwischen Stettin und Szczecin: Metamorphosen einer Stadt zwischen 1945 und 2005. Inaugural-Dissertation zur Erlangung der Doktorwürde, vorgelegt an der Kulturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), 29. Januar 2008. 347 pages.

+ Bernd Aischmann. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, die Stadt Stettin ausgenommen: Eine zeitgeschichtliche Betrachtung Schwerin: Thomas Helms Verlag 2008. 228 pages.

+ Stig Dagerman. Tysk höst [German Autumn]. Stockholm: Norstedts 1947 167, [1] pages and later editions. Has been translated to other languages, among them German (Deutscher Herbst). Hans-Åke Persson. Retorik och realpolitik: Storbritannien och de fördrivna tyskarna efter andra världskriget [Rhetoric and Realpolitik: Great Britain and the Displaced Germans after World War II] Lund : Lund University. Press 1993 325, [2] pages. CESIC studies in international conflict. Dissertation. German translation: Hans-Åke Persson: Rhetorik und Realpolitik: Großbritannien, die Oder-Neiße-Grenze und die Vertreibung der Deutschen nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Frankfurter Studien zur Grenzregion, Band 3. Potsdam: Verlag für Berlin-Brandenburg 1997. 215 pages.

By Thomas Lundén February 18, 2010