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Anders Nordström has a Ph.D. in political science and is post doctoral researcher at CBEES since 2010. His main specialization is European politics, transnational regulation and international organizations monitoring of states with a focus on the Council of Europe and the Eastern Enlargement of this organization.

Anders Nordström

Anders Nordström has a Ph.D. in political science and is post doctoral researcher at CBEES since 2010. His main specialization is European politics, transnational regulation and international organizations monitoring of states with a focus on the Council of Europe and the Eastern Enlargement of this organization. In his ongoing research project the Council of Europe’s monitoring of new members as a form of cosmopolitan politics. In the project the monitoring processes of Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan is compared. Anders Nordström views the drawn out monitoring processes as the creation of a sustained form of critical dialogue on what ”European values” means in specific cases. The monitoring brings together a number of independent monitoring processes and actors to a continuous and open creation of soft regulation concerning how states in Europe ought to act in relation to their residents. He suggests that this is an example of cosmopolitan politics in the sense that European and national regulative processes are intertwined and interacts with each other in a quasi-legal space that is both national and European.

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Articles by Anders Nordström

  1. Reconciliation rather than revolt How monitoring complicates perspectives on democratization

    In Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia an extended transition period is taking place, monitored and orchestrated by the European Council. Here it is investigated how to understand long-term interference of the international community in the affairs of states that strive to be recognized as democratic.

  2. Armenian Presidental Election Unexpected change in the political landscape

    The impression is that the Armenian politicians are balancing the expectations of the Armenian public and the International Community. Both government and opposition have to show that they are responsible politicians that will not resort to violence and that are ready to accept defeat and continue constructive dialogue with their political opponents.

  3. Armenian parliamentary elections 2012 – an extremely well scrutinized operation

    A week before elections the head of the Armenian Central Election Committee announced that the Armenian parliamentary election would be monitored by over 30 000 observers, both foreign and domestic. The elections in Armenia 2012 were far from revolutionary, but perhaps it was a sign of a gradual evolution of Armenian democracy towards normality. The election results have not yet being challenged and parliament is better representing the political forces in the country and the party system is more consolidated.

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