Peer-reviewed articles

Peer-reviewed articles have all been through a peer-review process. We practice double-blind peer-review. All material is reviewed by two independent specialists at least at post-doc level. A prerequisite for publishing scientific articles in Baltic Worlds is that the article has not already been published in English elsewhere. If an article is simultaneously being considered by another publication, this should be indicated when submitting.

Fatherhood Across space and time Russia in perspective

Fatherhood in Russia today is a vague institution. The role of the father is developing in several directions at the same time, both in state policies and in the private sphere. The lack of coherence is somewhat surprising since active, engaged fatherhood has proven to be an important factor to reverse declining birth rates, which is a key factor behind Russia's current demographic crisis.

By Johnny Rodin & Pelle Åberg January 23, 2014

National History as a Fairy Tale A study of bulgarian historical memory

The results of the present study, the first of its kind in Bulgaria, demonstrate the scope of the historical memory of Bulgarian citizens. The work reveals how consolidated and coherent the historical memory of the majority group is, and at the same time how fragmented the memories of the minority groups can be.

By Evelina Kelbecheva November 11, 2013

Governance models of Baltic port authorities

The present article presents the results of a synthesis of the literature on port authority governance models worldwide. Our aim is to make a comparative analysis of existing governance models in four major seaports in the Baltic states — Tallinn, Estonia; Klaipeda, Lithuania; and Riga and Ventspils, Latvia — to identify key challenges and propose possible solutions for sustainable port authority governance.

By Valters Bolevics, Jan Sjölin & Tatjana Volkova November 7, 2013

Vikings as transmigrant people A new approach to hybrid artifacts

The wish to ethnically classify everything found in the Viking Age trading locations has led archaeologists to neglect the fact that material in those ethnic categories displays not only similarities but also frequent variations, argues the author. She calls for acknowledgment of the differences and variations within those presupposed ethnic categories.

By Lina Håkansdotter November 7, 2013

Nature, the Volk, and the Heimat The narratives and practices of the far-right ecologist

The authors examine neo-Nazis’ increased interest in issues involving the environment and nature, and scrutinize their reasoning about commodification and globalization.

By Madeleine Hurd & Steffen Werther October 29, 2013

Winds of Change and the spatial transformation of post-socialist cities

The diverse mosaic of urban experiences in Prague, Riga, Belgrade, and Tirana is related to major drivers of change in the economic, social, and institutional environment. In mapping an analytical terrain for this comparative study, the “socialist city” is taken as the primary point of departure. One set of influences represents the outcomes associated with the transition to markets, democracy, and decentralized government.

By Sasha Tsenkova May 14, 2013

The stuff of myth and the Baltic Sea

Grass’s Flounder contributes to our work of locating, dislocating, and relocating literature in the Baltic Sea region by challenging us to give attention to the lost or hidden stories that are ignored or played off against each other in the official versions of history that would fix our position in space. While Grass counters the seduction of the big story — universal history — he also reveals himself by getting caught in the contradiction of his own storytelling.

By Kenneth J. Knoespel May 14, 2013

BECOMING FULL MEMBERS OF SOCIETY

In the first post-revolutionary years the Bolshevik government saw Tatar and Bashkir women as important allies. Muslim women from the Volga-Ural region were to be educated and taught about their rights, and this educational campaign was seen as contributing to the development of the new socialist society. Women’s ignorance was seen by the Soviet authorities as an obstacle to progress which had to be overcome with the help of the new institutions like Commissions for the Improvement of the Work and Everyday Life of Women.

By Yulia Gradskova January 8, 2013

Remembering the Shipyard Strike

This article focus on how the Gdańsk shipyard strike and the formation of Solidarity have been remembered and observed afterwards, especially in connection with the 30th anniversary in August 2010. The author explores how people create meaning in past events in relation to current interests, and how the depiction of a shared history is constantly recast and used.

By Karin S Lindelöf January 8, 2013

a hundred years later streetcars are still rattling in Baltic cities

A young geographer by the name of Sten De Geer mapped the cities around the Baltic Sea in an article published in 1912. As an attempt to capture the urban structure of Baltic region cities, his paper is unique. In this article, we comment on his meticulous descriptions of these cities, with a century-long perspective.

By Thomas Lundén January 7, 2013